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Pianist steve kuhn and bassist Steve swallow first played the title track of the new ECM album Wisteria together back in the early 60’s. At the time both were members of Art Farmer’s band, who wrote the tune. The two have played together a number of times in the intervening decades, and have a warm rapport. The third member of the Wisteria tzrio is drummer Joey Baron, who appeared on Kuhn’s 2009 Mostly Coltrane project. Wisteria represents the first recording of this trio, and it is a great example of the three musicians playing at the top of their form. […] For a trio so well-versed in the downtown avant-garde scene for so long, these three musicians have pulled off a unique feat. Wisteria is both accessible and challenging, yet maintains a uniformity of excellence. It is an album that should speak to a wide variety of jazz fans.
Greg Barbrick, Blindedbysound.com

Pianist Steve Kuhn’s association with bassist Steve Swallow, with whom he reunites on Wisteria, goes back to the mid-‘60s. That’s when they played together in Art Farmer’s band and then in Kuhn’s trio. And as long as we’re talking history, can we point out that with the exception of Ahmad Jamal, no living jazz pianist of note has thived in the trio format longer or with greater distinction than Kuhn? […] The recording marks the first time this trio has played together, and hopefully it won’t be the last.
Lloyd Sachs, Jazz Times

Kuhn ist wahrlich ein Ästhet der Tongebung. Kaum jemand bringt im Jazz die Musik derart zum Leuchten, das Klavier derart zum Singen. So erweist sich Kuhn wieder einmal als echter Geschichtenerzähler.
Tilman Urbach, Stereo

[…] theirs is a perfectly matched and timeless partnership that showcases three masters who make this quite challenging music appear easy. And Kuhn, who seems to be in the midst of a career renaissance at the age of 74, or is at least getting a long overdue burst of recognition, proves again why he is one of our true piano masters.
Joel Roberts, The New York City Jazz Record

[…] a program of eleven songs that make Wisteria yet another milestone in Kuhn’s discography, and a more than worthy follow-up to the critically acclaimed Mostly Coltrane.
John Kelman, Allaboutjazz.com

Wisteria, le thème si beau d’Art Farmer, justement, voit passer le trio de la sérénité pensive à l’expressivité expansive. Steve Kuhn, invraisemblable d’autorité rythmique et d’invention harmonique; Steve Swallow, développant des lignes de chant mélodique; Joey Baron, subtil dans ses écoutes du piano, fabuleux artificier dans ses relances fortes : trois grands musiciens qui jouent des dynamiques de telle sorte que le mot perfection s’impose à l’esprit. Alors là, oui, chapeau les artistes !
Michel Contat, Télérama

Pianist Steve Kuhn and bassist Steve Swallow first played the title track of the new ECM album Wisteria together back in the early 60’s. At the time both were members of Art Farmer’s band, who wrote the tune. The two have played together a number of times in the intervening decades, and have a warm rapport. The third member of the Wisteria trio is drummer Joey Baron, who appeared on Kuhn’s 2009 Mostly Coltrane project. Wisteria represents the first recording of this trio, and it is a great example of the three musicians playing at the top of their form. […] For a trio so well-versed in the downtown avant-garde scene for so long, these three musicians have pulled off a unique feat. Wisteria is both accessible and challenging, yet maintains a uniformity of excellence. It is an album that should speak to a wide variety of jazz fans.
Greg Barbrick, Blindedbysound.com

Pianist Steve Kuhn’s association with bassist Steve Swallow, with whom he reunites on Wisteria, goes back to the mid-‘60s. That’s when they played together in Art Farmer’s band and then in Kuhn’s trio. And as long as we’re talking history, can we point out that with the exception of Ahmad Jamal, no living jazz pianist of note has thrived in the trio format longer or with greater distinction than Kuhn? […] The recording marks the first time this trio has played together, and hopefully it won’t be the last.
Lloyd Sachs, Jazz Times

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